DEPRESSION CARE


Between 2008 and 2009 quality care for depression improved considerably.








Depression is an illness that involves a person's mood, thoughts, and body. It can affect eating, sleeping, and general outlook. Appropriate treatment may help people who suffer from depression. There are many forms of depression and the measures in this report focus on treatment for adults who have been diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder, which is also called major depression, clinical depression, or unipolar depression.

Between 2008 and 2009, two measures for depression improved considerably in Kansas City.

One measure, which shows the percent of patients in each doctor's group who stay on anti-depressant medication for 12 weeks following their initial diagnosis of major depression, improved from 44% to 63%.

Another measure, which shows the percent of patients in each doctor's group who stay on anti-depressant medication for six months following their initial diagnosis of major depression improved from 31% to 45%.

Depression takes a big emotional toll on individuals and families. For some people, regular conversations with a therapist can help control depression, while others benefit from medication, or need a combination of both. Medication for depression takes time to work and you might need to stay on it for many months even if you are feeling better. If medication is part of your treatment plan, it is important to continue to take your medications or go back to your doctor if the medicine is not working.

Good health requires a partnership. Your doctor cannot do it alone.

Find information and tools to help manage depression >